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The Ultimate Cheapskate's Road Map to True Riches: A Practical (and Fun) Guide to Enjoying Life More by Spending Less

The Ultimate Cheapskate's Road Map to True Riches: A Practical (and Fun) Guide to Enjoying Life More by Spending Less - Jeff Yeager I like this book more because of what it says about my personal journey in the last 3 years than what it actually says. I started this book thinking it was great for the personal finance it was teaching me, and it was cute and funny to boot! I ended it by skimming and skipping and thinking of other things while 'reading'.

As it happens, I read this book over the course of 3 years. This says less about my attention span (Squirrel!) than it would seem - truth is, in 2009 I becamse so enamored of personal finance that I would read a tidbit, then go off and research the hell out of it, some months later, I would read more, and so on.

2008/2009 seems to have been a rare period of action and change for me. Like most people, I usually maintain my status quo while thinking of the things I should do in the most fleeting of ways. 2008/2009 saw my estranged husband return to our abode, saw him lose his job in the financial meltdown, saw me choose to leave my beloved NYC to move to Iowa, saw me fundamentally change the way I eat food, and saw me, appropo to the time, take a good hard look at my (our) financial future.

Enter this book.

At the time, it was a good introduction to the most sound personal finance advice I've come across: stop spending your money. While nowhere near as profound as [b:Your Money or Your Life: Transforming Your Relationship with Money and Achieving Financial Independence|78428|Your Money or Your Life Transforming Your Relationship with Money and Achieving Financial Independence|Joe Dominguez|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1170943850s/78428.jpg|1509321], it was the first inkling I really ever had that rather than suffering by cutting back, non-reliance on 'stuff' could bring it's own bliss in the form of independence and achievment (and, by the way, spirituality, creativity, a return to my beloved reading, interpersonal relationships, and all sorts of other things that don't cost money!).

I'm not kidding - pre-2008 me literally spent her weekends shopping...as SPORT! Mon Dieu! When I think of all the garbage I bought... well, let me just use a worn phrase: If I knew then what I know now....

Anyway, here I am 3 years later, I have a healthy emergency fund, both cars are fully paid off, and if things go according to plan, so will the mortgage be in about 3 years from now.

So it's in this state of buying in bulk (store brand, of course) and maxed out 401ks and Roth IRAs that I complete this book. Naturally, I am no longer in need of learning the concept of paying-for-TV-is-stupid-especially-when-you-can-download-TV-for-the-cost-of-an-internet-connection, hence the skimming and Kindle-forward-button-pressing.

But it is a good book. It's non-threatening, the advice is solid, and everyone can follow it.